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Fleas, Ticks and Intestinal Worms

 

Fleas
Fleas are small, fast moving insects that live on the skin and hair of the dog or cat.
 

  • They are a significant cause of allergy, dermatitis and scratching in dogs and cats, and can also transmit some species of intestinal worms.
  • Flea prevention is not essential in all pets, but is highly recommended in areas with a high flea population or for animals who spend a lot of time outdoors.
  • Frontline and Revolution are highly effective and very safe treatments for fleas. They are both available as drops that are applied to the skin behind the neck once per month.
  • Advantix is an excellent product that treats both fleas and ticks, as well as lice and biting insects. Advantix is only available for dogs and should not be used on cats.
  • Please note that flea and tick shampoos and pyrethrin-based products are not particularly effective, and resistance is commonly seen.



Ticks
Ticks are an 8-legged bug that look somewhat like a large, slow moving flea. Apart from causing irritation and possible blood loss, ticks often carry Babesia, a microscopic parasite which can cause Tick Fever in dogs.
 

  • Tick Fever is a life-threatening condition somewhat similar to malaria in people.
  • Common signs include lethargy, pale gums and very dark coloured urine.
  • Tick Fever is diagnosed on a regular basis in dogs living in Hong Kong.
  • Ticks are most common in bushy areas, but are present throughout Hong Kong.
  • Using Advantix with a Preventic Tick collar is the most effective preventative for ticks, killing about 95% of ticks that come into contact with your dog. Frontline is also fairly effective for tick prevention
  • Please note that flea and tick shampoos and pyrethrin-based products are not particularly effective, and resistance is commonly seen.
  • Ticks are rare in cats but do cause irritation and in severe cases can cause blood loss.


Worms
 

  • Dogs and cats are susceptible to a number of intestinal worm infections, including tapeworm, hookworm, roundworm and whipworm.
  • Puppies and kittens should be given a tablet for intestinal worms at each initial vaccination, and then every 3-6 months as an adult. Cats can also use a liquid spot-on treatment for worms that is applied to the back of the neck.
  • Control of intestinal worms is important for the health of your pet, and can in some cases also be important in preventing transmission of worms to family members.